Tibetan Mastiff - Appearance & Grooming

Source: PetWave, Updated on July 16, 2015
Tibetan Mastiff

Appearance

Tibetan Mastiffs are large dogs with massive heads, heavy bone structure and a thick, medium-length coat. The head of the Tibetan Mastiff is often described as bear-like in shape and features, as it is wedge shaped and sports a blunt, wide muzzle. The teeth should meet in a scissors bite. The nose is black. Males tend to have a moderate dewlap. They are slightly longer than they are tall, with a level topline. The coat is thick and forms a mane around the neck, but the hair on the head is short. The long tail is plumed and curls over the back of the dog. They may come in black, brown, gold or blue and they may or may not have tan markings above the eyes, on the side of the muzzle, on the throat, forelegs, rear legs or breeches. Some may sport white markings on the chest and feet.

Size and Weight

Adult Male Tibetan Mastiffs should stand taller than 26 inches at the shoulder, and females should be taller than 24 inches. They are slightly longer than they are tall, with a correct ratio of 10:9. While there is no weight standard, Tibetan Mastiffs typically weigh anywhere from 100 to 170 pounds.

Coat and Color

The Tibetan Mastiff wears a thick double coat made up of a soft and wooly undercoat and a long, coarse topcoat. The hair should always be straight and never be even slightly wavy. There is a thick mane at the neck and shoulder and the tail and upper thighs are feathered. Males typically have a heavier, thicker coat than females.

They may come in black, brown, gold or blue and they may or may not have tan markings above the eyes, on the side of the muzzle, on the throat, forelegs, rear legs or breeches. Some may sport white markings on the chest and feet.

Grooming Needs

The Tibetan Mastiff's coat should be brushed two to three times per week to remove loose and dead hair, and keep the coat healthy. They shed very little, and depending upon the climate, may not even shed seasonally. They only need to be bathed as needed, which usually amounts to once every four to six weeks.

Check the ears on a weekly basis for signs of infection, irritation, or wax build up. Cleanse regularly with a veterinarian-approved cleanser and cotton ball. Brush the teeth at least once per week to prevent tartar buildup and fight gum disease. Additionally, nails should be trimmed once per month if the dog does not wear the toenails down naturally.

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