Plott Hound - Temperament & Personality

Source: PetWave, Updated on July 16, 2015
Plott Hound

Personality

Plott Hounds originated in the Hills of North Carolina where they were used to hunt bear and wild boar. This makes them sturdy, fearless hunting companions and excellent family watchdogs. Plotts need to live in an active household with people who love the outdoors. They enjoy hiking, running and romping in the yard, and hunters still use them in the field to hunt large game. Plott Hounds are pack dogs and are at their happiest in a home with multiple dogs for him to socialize with. Plotts are generally friendly toward strangers and enjoy the company of older, well-behaved children.

Activity Requirements

Plott Hounds need a lot of activity to maintain health and happiness. They can spend an entire day in the field tracking and penning prey, so companion Plotts should be allowed to run as much as possible during the day to burn off excess energy. They make excellent jogging companions and enjoy trotting alongside bike riders. They make excellent hiking and camping companions, acting as both comrade and protector.

These are pure country dogs and do not do well in houses without yards or in apartments. Plotts need room to run and roam, and if penned inside all day will become rambunctious and destructive.

Trainability

Plotts are a snap to train for experienced dog owners. If used in the field, they need virtually no training to work with a hunter. At home, obedience training goes quickly and smoothly if conducted early. This breed exhibits dominance, so it is imperative to teach them as puppies who exactly runs the household. Once leadership is established, everything else falls into place. Plotts are pack animals who instinctively respect the leader. Treats and positive reinforcement should be all you need to train a young Plott. Older Plotts who have developed bad habits may require a firmer hand, but this breed should never be treated harshly. If they aren't afraid to attack bears, they surely won't be scared to nip at you. Boundaries are important and rule enforcement should be done with absolute consistency.

Behavioral Traits

Plotts are not well-suited for families with small children. This breed exhibits dominance, is possessive of food and is not patient when poked or prodded. They do fine with children over the age of ten, who understand and respect the dog's boundaries.

Plott Hounds were designed to hunt bear and wild boar. This makes them fearless, but also prone to animal aggression. When raised alongside other dogs, this pack breed is very happy, but outside dogs beware, the Plott isn't likely to accept new members. Unless you are in the field with your Plott, he should be kept in fenced in yards or on a leash at all times.

Plotts tend to bark. Their barking comes in handy in the field, but can drive you crazy at home. Teaching your dog to obey commands to stop barking can help, but it is an inborn trait that can not be trained away.

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