Dog Poison in Dogs | Information on Canine Poison Ivy

Dog Poison Ivy

Definition

Poison ivy (Toxicodendron radicans) is a woody vine that produces a toxic resin called urushiol, which causes intense itchiness and raised rashes when it comes into contact with skin. This plant grows all over the United States and is identifiable by its bright green color and distinctive three-leaf structure. While a dog’s hair coat provides some physical protection from poison ivy, exposed areas where hair is thin or absent, such as the belly, inner legs, external genitalia and muzzle, can be affected. Short-haired and hairless breeds are at increased risk. Contact between poison ivy and the skin causes severe dermatitis. Dogs itch, scratch, lick, chew and bite at their skin, developing open sores and raised red patches that may blister and weep. If a dog eats poison ivy, its mouth and throat can become irritated and inflamed. It can also develop a terrible tummy ache and become extremely sick.

Causes and Prevention of Poison Ivy in Dogs

Poison ivy is a woody vine that produces a toxic resin called urushiol that causes intense itching and rashes when it comes into contact with skin. Poison ivy grows in most parts of the United States and is best identified by its bright green color and three-leaf structure.While a dog’s hair coat provides some physical protection from poison ivy, the skin of exposed areas where hair is thin or absent, such as on the belly,

Symptoms of Poison Ivy in Dogs

Symptoms of Poison ivy reactions to the skin in dogs can include raised bumps or swelling of the skin. The dog may become very itchy, and the skin may also become inflamed. The raised bumps may start to blister and ooze clear fluids. If a dog ingests Poison ivy, the dog may experience sudden vomiting or diarrhea.If your dog begins to show any of these symptoms, a prompt visit to the veterinarian is highly recommended.

Treatment and Prognosis of Poison Ivy in Dogs

Contact with poison ivy or poison oak – plants in the genus Toxicodendron - can cause serious dermatitis in dogs, and in people as well. Skin that comes into contact with these plants becomes inflamed, irritated, red and raised. The oil from the leaves of Toxicodendron plants causes intense itching in affected areas. Small breeds with short-haired coats are more likely to develop clinical signs.If you suspect that your dog has come in contact with

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