Pekingese - Temperament & Personality

Source: PetWave, Updated on July 16, 2015
Pekingese

Personality

The Pekingese originated in the Imperial courts of China. They were held in high regard and often given as gifts among the nobility. This regal air is still common in modern Pekingese, who believe themselves to be royalty, and expect their families to treat them as nobility and not helpless lap dogs. According to the AKC Standard, Pekingese "should imply courage, boldness, and self-esteem rather than prettiness, daintiness, or delicacy." Pekingese make excellent companions for older people who have the time to devote all of their attention to their dog, as this breed demands a lot of attention. They adore their immediate family but are wary of strangers, which makes them excellent little watchdogs.

Activity Requirements

Pekingese can be happy in a big home or an apartment, as they don't need a lot of vigorous activity to maintain health and happiness. They like to take walks, proudly strutting their stuff around the neighborhood, and will love playing outdoors, but as they get older they become less playful.

Trainability

Pekingese are notoriously difficult to train. They believe they are in charge of the home, and many owners have a tendency to treat them this way. This can lead to near-impossible training sessions. You must begin early with your Pekingese, establish leadership and a chain of command with you at t the top. Trying to train this breed when they have established themselves as the leader of the pack is almost always futile. Food is an excellent motivator, as is lots of excited praise. Keep sessions short and vary the activities in order to hold his intereest.

Behavioral Traits

Pekingese are not recommended for families with small children. They are possessive of their toys and food and can snap or bite toddlers who do not understand how to respect a dog's boundaries. They demand a lot of attention and can become resentful of children who may take the focus away from them.

Pekingese are generally well-behaved, but they are prone to barking. They will bark at people, animals, cars, and leaves blowing across the yard. When left alone for long periods of time, their barking can get out of hand. It is recommended that people who work long hours not adopt a Pekingese. They are better suited for retirees or families with a stay at home or work at home parent.

It can be easy to shelter a Pekingese. They are tiny and people love to carry them and tote them around in purses. You must walk a fine line, though. Over-sheltered Pekingese can become very high strung. It is important to give your Pekingese independence. Let him walk on a leash rather than tote him around in a bag and socialize him around people and other animals so that he knows how to greet and be greeted with proper manners.

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