Dog Submissive Behavior | How to Stop Submissive Urination

How to Stop Submissive Urination

Submissive
Dogs, or puppies, that submissively urinate do so as a way of saying, “Hey, I’m the submissive one here, you don’t need to worry about me being dominant.” These dogs are often very insecure, they have low confidence, they may have been abused in the past, or they may be very sensitive or easily excited.

Introduction

Dogs, or puppies, that submissively urinate do so as a way of saying, “Hey, I’m the submissive one here, you don’t need to worry about me being dominant.” These dogs are often very insecure, they have low confidence, they may have been abused in the past, or they may be very sensitive or easily excited. If your dog is submissively urinating, here are a few things that you can do to prevent this behavior.

Training Tips for Dogs that Submissively Urinate

You will need to begin to prevent submissive urination in your dog by building up your dog’s confidence, and the trust relationship between you and your dog. Play lots of gentle games with your dog, encourage your dog during this play, give plenty of verbal praise, and give an occasional treat reward. Build up the trust relationship between you and your dog by being extra sensitive to your canine friend’s feelings. Do not yell or raise your voice when you are communicating with your dog, always use positive reinforcement when you are teaching your dog new rules or commands, and never ever physically punish your dog.

To let your dog know that submissive urination is not needed in this relationship, try not to engage in dominant behavior with the dog. Instead of picking up the dog or coming towards the dog for a greeting or moment of affection, wait until the dog comes to you. Concentrate more on petting the dog under the chin and rubbing the back area; try to stay away from patting the dog’s head or rubbing the dog’s tummy when you are not invited to do so, and avoid continual eye contact with your dog during this delicate time.

Try to keep your dog from becoming overly excited. When you come home tell your dog hello in a calm tone, and then keep walking through the door. When the dog comes to greet you gently pet the dog, and then walk away for a bit. Let visiting guests know that your dog is sensitive, and educate them on how to relate properly to your dog.

Source: PetWave

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